Jerusalem

Jerusalem
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A Cookbook

با ترجمه عنوان، و توضیح کوتاه هر کتاب 10,000 تومان اعتبار برای خرید کتاب دریافت کنید. این ترجمه با نام شما در سایت نمایش داده خواهد شد
iran گزارش تخلف

فرمت کتاب

ebook

تاریخ انتشار

2012

نویسنده

Aaron Peckham

نویسنده

Abbie E. Goldberg

نویسنده

Aaron Peckham

نویسنده

Abbie E. Goldberg

نویسنده

Sami Tamimi
  • اطلاعات
  • نقد و بررسی
  • دیدگاه کاربران
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نقد و بررسی

Publisher's Weekly

July 16, 2012
Written as homage to the city that defines the authors, this cookbook offers snapshots of the multicultural, multiflavored city that is Jerusalem. Realizing the difficulties of trying to capture the diversity of a city that has been described as “the center of the universe” Ottolenghi and Tamimi only promise “a glimpse into hidden treasure” of a city constructed upon centuries of fusion, or the lack thereof, of hundreds of cultures being mashed together in such a small space. Not wanting to offend the inhabitants of an already disputed territory, the authors try to cut a cross-section of recipes and ingredients native to the inhabitants of Jerusalem. From Tunisia (shakshuka) to Turkey (Swiss chard fritters) and Iran (broad bean kuku) to Lebanon (the delicious hummus kawarma), this cookbook promises to excite the taste buds of anyone interested in Middle Eastern cuisine. Not happy with just presenting the flavors and textures of the city, the authors try to encapsulate the history and spirit of the city, too. With multiple introductions at its front, explanations of different spices and ingredients, and anecdotal stories peppered throughout, this book offers not only taste but education as well.



Library Journal

October 15, 2012
London chefs and business partners Ottolenghi and Tamimi both grew up in Jerusalem (the former in the Jewish west, the latter in the Arab east). Drawing on their childhood experiences for inspiration, they've updated traditional recipes (e.g., Falafel, Tabbouleh, Lamb Shawarma) to suit the lifestyles and preferences of modern home cooks. Though it isn't comprehensive, the book includes a wealth of historical and cultural information. VERDICT Ottolenghi's "Plenty", a collection of innovative vegetarian recipes, was widely considered one of the best cookbooks of 2011, so expect demand for his latest.

Copyright 2012 Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.



Booklist

Starred review from October 1, 2012
The true definition of a melting pot, it seems, can be found through foods, or so Ottolenghi and Tamimi contend. As former residents of Jerusalem and now well-acclaimed London restaurateurs, they have compiled a luscious, photographic collection of 120 recipes with origins encompassing various religions, countries, and, occasionally, continents. The history of the city and of foods found there are sprinkled throughout the text, as are visuals not only of recipes but also of the people who inhabit Jerusalem and beyond. Expect discourses on the humble aubergine (eggplant); za'atar, a native herb; hummus wars; and even Georgian cuisine. The book's leisurely pace picks up with the introduction of dishes, some familiar but many not, that include fattoush, latkes, mejadra, clear chicken soup with knaidlach, pan-fried mackerel with golden beetroot and orange salsa, and helbeh (fenugreek cake). Measurements are computed in grams, and, unfortunately, the more exotic ingredients, such as arak and zhoug, might prove elusive to all but the most avid chefs. Yet the passion and skill evident in this collection of Mediterranean cuisine are contagious.(Reprinted with permission of Booklist, copyright 2012, American Library Association.)




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